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Here’s How Easy It Is

…to move your scales into all keys

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Change Key of a Scale Shape on Guitar

If you want to improvise or play and make up your own guitar solos or licks then it is crucial that you can move your scale shapes around into different keys.  When you can do this your guitar playing will take a massive step forward and you’ll be able to play and express your ideas more fluently than ever before on your guitar.

In all the guitar lessons I’ve done (over 17,000!) I’ve seen this basic skill hold up more players than almost anything else – the lessons I teach you in this video are essential!

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:21 Why you need to be able to move your scales around into other keys to play any music – blues, country, rock, metal – anything!

0:47 Step 1 is to learn some of the notes along the low E string on your guitar. This basic step is super important and not knowing them can have a disasterous effect on your guitar playing and soloing! So here I show you the notes, complete with description and fingering guidelines.

2:20 How to use the root note in the scale pattern to figure out where to play the scale on the neck to be in the right key. Here I demonstrate it with C minor pentatonic and G minor pentatonic. Note that the scale pattern stays exactly the same – we’re just playing it at a different fret.

4:20 How to use the root note to move the A blues scale into the key of D to turn it into D blues scale.. Complete with description and fingering guidelines. This fingering is great for covering more of the guitar neck.

5:00 Watch these videos if you haven’t seen these two guitar scale shapes before.

5:10 Summary of what we’ve learned so far and how it can help your guitar playing.

5:50 How to move the major pentatonic scale around to other keys. Hee the root note is played by the little finger. I demonstrate this here by moving A major pentatonic up to the 12th fret to become E major pentatonic.

7:20 Here I show you how to move your scale shapes up above the 12th fret to get the scale up an octave.

8:05 Summary of what we’ve studied in this video lesson.

 

 

 

 


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Mixolydian Licks
Start Getting That Tasty Mixolydian Sound In Your Solos

 

So you know the mixolydian mode and how to play it on guitar

But how can you start it rip out cool, tasty mixolydian ideas in your solos (instead of just playing the scale pattern)?

These licks will help! Discover essential bends and note groupings which will quickly transform your mixolydian soloing and set you on the road to ‘mixolydian soloing mastery’!

 

 

 

 

 

The mixolydian scale or mixolydian mode is used extensively in blues, rock, jazz, funk and pop music. Knowing the mixolydian scale pattern is a good start – but you also need to build a vocabulary or library of cool sounding mixolydian licks and ideas to help you learn how to use it in your guitar solos and improvisations.

That’s what this guitar lesson is all about! You’ll learn 3 great mixolydian licks to kick start your mixolydian soloing TODAY!

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:15 Hear me demonstrate guitar soloing using the mixolydian mode. Notice how the mixolydian scale has a bright but bluesy sound. Here I am soloing with E mixolydian over an E7 chord.

0:35 Lots of guitar players get very confused by the word ‘mode’. But simply think of it as another name for a scale. So the mixolydian mode is simply a name for a particular type of scale. Watch my lesson covering the theory behind the scale and when we use it by clicking here: https://youtu.be/RCG5iUMd6VU

1:00 How to play the E mixolydian mode or scale on guitar. Here you’ll learn a mixolydian scale pattern and an E7 arpeggio shape you can use. Fingerings and description included. These are the same patterns I covered in the Mixolydian Mode Lesson but moved to the key of E. If you’re not sure how to change the key of a scale watch here: https://youtu.be/Ft_uuN3n0M0

3:16  Mixolydian Lick 1 – A cool bluesy lick using a few cool bends. Remember to use your picking hand to control the bends by cutting them off before you let them down. Also try to learn which notes in the scale shape are good notes to bend – this will help you learn to effectively use the scale pattern in a musical way.

7:20 Mixolydian Lick 2 – Another cool phrase using a few tasty bending moves. Experiment with these string bending ideas in your own soloing.

11:33 Mixolydian Lick 3 – This lick makes extensive use of the notes from the arpeggio shape. This is the backbone of the scale so pay special attention to these notes in the scale pattern – very important!

14:45 What to do with these licks. Learn the licks, find a cool E7 backing track and practice using them over it. The next step is to take your favourite parts of these licks and use them as a starting point for your own ideas. Experimentation is the key to becoming a great improviser so make sure you do a lot of it!

 

 


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Start Using the Mixolydian Mode…

Today!

 

 

 

 

 

The mixolydian mode is used extensively in blues, rock, jazz, funk and pop music. But what is it? And what is a mode? This lesson will answer most of your questions about how to play and use the mixolydian mode on guitar in a clear and easy to understand fashion.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:15 Hear me demonstrate guitar soloing using the mixolydian mode. Notice it has a bright but bluesy sound. Here I am soloing with E mixolydian over an E7 chord.We’ll be looking at why this works so well in just a moment.

0:54 Lots of guitar players get very confused by the word ‘mode’. But simply think of it as another name for a scale. So the ‘mixolydian mode’ is simply a name for a particular type of scale which will work in a particular musical situation.

1:08 Here you’ll learn a mixolydian scale pattern you can use. Fingerings and description included. Get this down and you can start experimenting with using it in your playing straight away.

2:18 What do we use the scale for? If we examine the notes in the C mixolydian mode we see it contains the 4 notes which make up a c dominant7 (C7) chord. These notes are the ‘skeleton’ of the mode, giving it it’s basic sound. So it is used for soloing and improvising over dominant 7 chords. C mixolydian will work great over a C7 chord groove because the scale ‘outlines’ the sound of this chord.

3:55 It also works over other more colourful dominant type chords such as 9th, 11th and 13th chords. This is because these are basically just decorated versions of the basic C7 chord anyway. Find or record yourself playing a groove on a C7 or C9 chord and then start experimenting with using the notes in the scale over it.

4:35 It’s a great idea to learn the dominant 7 arpeggio which is hiding inside the scale pattern. This will really help you to make your mixolydian improvising and soloing sound more melodic. Here you’ll learn a fingering for a C7 arpeggio which goes with the C mixolydian scale pattern we just saw.

6:43 The scale and arpeggio shapes are totally moveable and have their root note on the low E string. Use this to move them to other keys.

 

 


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