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Get That Sweet Blues & Country Rock Sound

…with this major pentatonic scale pattern!

 

 

 

 

 

The major pentatonic scale a really useful scale to learn on guitar. It is used extensively in blues, rock and especially country and country rock guitar playing –   It’s  a great way for beginners to start learning how to play lead guitar solos in major keys. Many guitar players struggle when they have to play a guitar solo in a major key, simply because they don’t have this scale under their fingertips. But not you! The scale shapes I’ll show you are quick and easy to learn and  you will use them all through your career as a guitar player.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:21 Why you need to learn the major pentatonic scale and how it is a commonly used scale in rock, pop and country music.

0:42 How to play the A major pentatonic scale shape. Complete with description and fingering guidelines.

1:54 How and why this major pentatonic scale pattern is similar to minor pentatonic scale pattern you’ve seen. This will be covered in more detail in an upcoming guitar lesson.

2:49 How to play the major pentatonic using an alternative scale shape. I call this one the ‘sliding’ shape because it features a slide in the middle. Complete with description and fingering guidelines. This fingering is great for covering more of the guitar neck.

4:08 Notice these two scales contain the same notes and can be used together at the same time. They are totally interchangeable.

4:30 Check out my other videos to learn how to put the scale into other keys and how to use it to improvise and create licks (coming soon if not up yet)..

 

 

 

 


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Bust Out Of Blues Scale ‘Shape 1’

…with this Sliding Blues Scale pattern

 

Do you feel like trapped within the same notes from the pentatonic scale while playing your solos? Well, in this lesson I’m gonna show you a really awesome little trick to really extend and expand your playing. Improve and expand your solos with this sliding blues scale.
Lots of classic blues and rock licks can be found in this scale shape. Licks used by Slash, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and many others.

 

 

 

The blues scale is one of the most important scales to learn on guitar. It is used extensively in blues, rock, metal, country and jazz guitar playing – in fact it’s hard to play almost anything without it.
In this lesson you’ll learn how to extend the basic blues scale shape to the Sliding Blues Scale and cover more of the guitar fingerboard. This will help you to learn to solo using more of the guitar neck. This one simple trick can transform you blues and rock guitar soloing! Why? Because there are so many awesome guitar licks nesting in the top part of this scale. You’ll be amazed at what you’ll find.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:35 Why you should know the extended minor pentatonic scale before learning the extended blues scale pattern. Why the blues scale is an essential part of  learning how to play guitar solos and licks and how to improvise.

1:04 Recap on how to play the basic blues scale shape. Demonstrated in the key of A. Complete with description and fingering guidelines. I also demo the blues scale with the added extension.

2:22 How to add the extension onto the basic blues  scale shape to work your way along the guitar neck. Fingering guidelines and scale description included.

4:30 Lots of classic blues and rock licks can be found in this minor pentatonic extension. Licks used by Slash, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and many others. Experimentation is the key to learning to use any scale. Here I suggest some ways you can start to experiment with this blues scale pattern in your playing.

 

 


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Solo Over More Of The Guitar Neck

…with this ‘sliding’ minor pentatonic scale pattern

 

 

 

 

The minor pentatonic scale is one of the most important scales to learn on guitar. It is used extensively in blues, rock, metal, country and jazz guitar playing – in fact it’s hard to play almost anything without it.
In this lesson you’ll learn how to extend the basic minor pentatonic scale shape and cover more of the guitar fingerboard. This will help you to learn to solo using more of the guitar neck. This one simple trick can transform you blues and rock guitar soloing! Why? Because there are so many awesome guitar licks nesting in the top part of this scale. You’ll be amazed at what you’ll find.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:30 Why extending the minor pentatonic scale is an essential part t to learning how to play guitar solos and licks and how to improvise.

0:49 Recap on how to play the basic A minor pentatonic scale shape. Complete with description and fingering guidelines.

1:14 How to add the extension onto the basic scale shape to work your way along the guitar neck. Fingering guidelines and scale description included.

2:40 Lots of classic blues and rock licks can be found in this minor pentatonic extension. Licks used by Slash, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and many others. Here I demo a few of these licks for you to hear.

3:25 Tips for fingering the sliding minor pentatonic pattern. By using this fingering your fingers will be in a good position to use the scale creatively when you improvise. Otherwise licks and scale runs could be more awkward to play.

4:30 Recap on the scale pattern for the sliding or extended minor pentatonic scale shape.

4:50 Tips about using this scale at the same time as the basic pattern. Because they contain the same notes they can be used at the same time. They are the same thing and are totally interchangeable.

5:50 How to learn to use the scale shape through experimentation and jamming!

 

 

 

 


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Quickly Learn This ‘Must Know’ Guitar Scale

 

The main tools you need to play guitar (and any instrument) solos are the scales, and today I’m gonna show you one of the more important scales: The Blues Scale. This scale shape is used extensively in blues, rock, metal, country and jazz guitar playing. I’t very easy and most of rock, blues and metal licks come from it.

Learning this scale shape is a great way for beginners to start learning how to play lead guitar solos. So, today we are going to recap how to play the A minor pentatonic scale, learn the Blues scale shape and why it’s so important.

 

 

 

The blues scale is one of the most important scales to learn on guitar. It is used extensively in blues, rock, metal, country and jazz guitar playing.

Learning the blues scale is a great way for beginners to start learning how to play lead guitar solos. The scale shape is quick and easy to learn especially if you already know the minor pentatonic scale on your guitar. Like the minor pentatonic, the blues scale is a scale you will use all through your career as a guitar player.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:21 Why the blues scale is so important if you want to learn how to play guitar solos, licks and how to improvise.

1:10 Recap on how to play the A minor pentatonic scale shape. Complete with description and fingering guidelines.

1:41 How you can easily turn the minor pentatonic scale into the blues scale simply by adding one more note to it to create a six not scale. Complete with description and fingering guidelines.

3:24 Important tips for fingering the scale when soloing and improvising.

 

 


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Learn To Play the Most Important Guitar Scale Ever!

 

 

 

 

 

The minor pentatonic scale is one of the most important scales to learn on guitar. It is used extensively in blues, rock, metal, country and jazz guitar playing – in fact it’s hard to play almost anything without it.  It’s  a great way for beginners to start learning how to play lead guitar solos. The scale shape is quick and easy to learn and it is a scale you will use all through your career as a guitar player. Millions of great guitar licks and solos have been played using this simple 5 note scale we call the minor pentatonic.

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:21 Why the minor pentatonic scale is a great place to start when you want to learn how to play guitar solos and licks and how to improvise.

0:42 How to play the A minor pentatonic scale shape. Complete with description and fingering guidelines.

2:12 Check out myother videos to learn how to put the scale into other keys and how to convert it into another essential scale: the blues scale.

 

 

 

 

 


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Here’s How Easy It Is

…to move your scales into all keys

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Change Key of a Scale Shape on Guitar

If you want to improvise or play and make up your own guitar solos or licks then it is crucial that you can move your scale shapes around into different keys.  When you can do this your guitar playing will take a massive step forward and you’ll be able to play and express your ideas more fluently than ever before on your guitar.

In all the guitar lessons I’ve done (over 17,000!) I’ve seen this basic skill hold up more players than almost anything else – the lessons I teach you in this video are essential!

Here’s a breakdown of what you learn in this video:

0:21 Why you need to be able to move your scales around into other keys to play any music – blues, country, rock, metal – anything!

0:47 Step 1 is to learn some of the notes along the low E string on your guitar. This basic step is super important and not knowing them can have a disasterous effect on your guitar playing and soloing! So here I show you the notes, complete with description and fingering guidelines.

2:20 How to use the root note in the scale pattern to figure out where to play the scale on the neck to be in the right key. Here I demonstrate it with C minor pentatonic and G minor pentatonic. Note that the scale pattern stays exactly the same – we’re just playing it at a different fret.

4:20 How to use the root note to move the A blues scale into the key of D to turn it into D blues scale.. Complete with description and fingering guidelines. This fingering is great for covering more of the guitar neck.

5:00 Watch these videos if you haven’t seen these two guitar scale shapes before.

5:10 Summary of what we’ve learned so far and how it can help your guitar playing.

5:50 How to move the major pentatonic scale around to other keys. Hee the root note is played by the little finger. I demonstrate this here by moving A major pentatonic up to the 12th fret to become E major pentatonic.

7:20 Here I show you how to move your scale shapes up above the 12th fret to get the scale up an octave.

8:05 Summary of what we’ve studied in this video lesson.

 

 

 

 


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